RAID DATA RECOVERY

HP Proliant DL380

An HP Proliant DL380 RAID 5 server

Yesterday I received an interesting Raid data recovery question from a prospective customer who was experiencing problems with his HP Proliant servers and was looking for an expert to help restore the data from them. He wrote:

“I have two HP proliant servers, both are RAID 5 configuration, one is DL380 G3, and the other DL180 G5.

Both had hard disk failures and are failing to load the OS even after the drives have been replaced.

Kindly let me know how we can recover these.”

My reply:

Hi there – thanks for your question. While I’m proficient in rescuing files from individual hard drives and SSD’s, retrieving them from failing RAID 5 servers is beyond my skills. I therefore recommend a company called Data Clinic who I have called on in the past when I’ve needed Raid data recovery. I know they have excellent abilities in working on HP Proliant servers so you will have excellent chances of getting your data recovered from both RAID 5 servers.

As the asker of the question failed to tell me what part of the UK he was from I was not able to recommend the nearest Data Clinic location to him so instead sent him details of their London data recovery operating centre and their Manchester head office.

Proliant servers are used across many LEA’s throughout the UK and I’ve had experience in commissioning and decommissioning them in Liverpool (2 locations), Leeds, York and Exeter. The Exeter location was a little out the way as I’m sure you can appreciate especially when you realise I’m based in Lancaster these days, but it was a tricky job and having several years working with both HP equipment and troubleshooting RAID 5 arrays I guess I was the obvious choice for the job. That was some 5 years ago though and I’ve been out of touch with RAID and HP devices for a while now, so rather than trust my rusty skills, I thought the best course of action was to recommend Data Clinic and I heard just before commencing this blog post that they had started recovering the data from both systems, so all’s well that ends well 🙂